Household chores: Women still do more  [LINK]
Women of all ages still tend to do more household chores than their male partners, no matter how much they work or earn in a job outside the home. New findings demonstrate the persistent gendered nature of how housework is divided. [Read More]
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For a better 'I,' there needs to be a supportive 'we'  [LINK]
If you're one of those lucky individuals with high motivation and who actively pursues personal growth goals, thank your family and friends who support you. [Read More]
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Beyond victims and perpetrators: The hidden side of violence against women  [LINK]
Catherine Whittaker is a PhD candidate in social anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. In this post, Catherine discusses the tendency to think about violence against women from a legal or health angle and how this risks blaming violence on victims and perpetrators alone, while obscuring social, cultural, and structural factors - which is what her fieldwork in Central Mexico focussed on. &n.... [Read More]
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Don’t let your team get you down  [LINK]
This is one of the biggest months of the year for sports fans. Both the AFL and NFL host their finals series, plus there’s the lead-up to the Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix, Rugby League World Cup, Fast5 Netball World Series and the Spring Racing Carnival in Melbourne. Supporting a sports team, whether it be football, netball, rugby or soccer, is a great way to be social and meet different... [Read More]
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Oxytocin turns up the volume of your social environment  [LINK]
A new study shows that the so-called 'love hormone' oxytocin can intensify negative as well as positive experiences. [Read More]
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Midlife depression may stem from tension with mothers and siblings, study finds  [LINK]
Relationships with our mothers and siblings continue to have an effect on our well-being, particularly at midlife. A new study found that tension with our mothers and siblings, similar to our spouses, is associated with symptoms of depression. [Read More]
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Building social communication skills in shy children helps with peer likeability  [LINK]
A new study has discovered that shy children with low English vocabulary skills, can still be popular among their peers if they have high-functioning social communication skills that enable them to engage and interact well with their peers in social settings. [Read More]
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Person-centred cultures in dementia care – learning to communicate ‘Beyond Words’  [LINK]
 Dr Julie Watson is a registered nurse and a Research Fellow in the University of Edinburgh’s School of Health in Social Sciences. Her research focusses on relating to people with dementia until the end of life in care homes. She is the author of CRFR Research Briefing 86 Face-to-Face: Relating to people with dementia until the end of life in care homes. Person-centred care... [Read More]
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How the shape and size of your face relates to your sexuality  [LINK]
Men and women with shorter, wider faces tend to be more sexually motivated and to have a stronger sex drive than those with faces of other dimensions. The research investigates the role that facial features play in sexual relationships and mate selection. [Read More]
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Couples weather bickering with a little help from their friends  [LINK]
New research finds that having good friends and family members to turn to alleviates the stress of everyday conflict between marital partners. Social networks may help provide protection against health problems brought about by ordinary tension between spouses. [Read More]
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Transition, transition, successful transition: What is it anyway?  [LINK]
CRFR Associate Director Professor Divya Jindal-Snape writes about her research on transitions, from early years to higher education. Nurseries, schools, colleges and universities go to a lot of effort to make sure that learners have ‘successful transitions’. Similarly, families do their utmost to support children to have successful transitions. But what does ‘successful tra.... [Read More]
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Behavior is considered more moral the more common it is  [LINK]
Is it less wrong to avoid tax if everyone else is doing it? A new study demonstrates that our view of what is morally right or wrong is shaped by how widespread a particular behavior is. These results can improve our understanding of the psychological mechanisms behind attitudinal change in society. [Read More]
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Relationship science: How can couples keep moving forward?  [LINK]
Family studies researchers who study the science behind maintaining romantic relationships focus their work on the central organizing unit -- the relationship -- rather than on the individual. In a recent study, they discuss romantic relationship maintenance and the two primary motives behind a couple's attempts at staying together: threat mitigation and relationship enhancement. [Read More]
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Looking stressed can help keep the peace  [LINK]
Scratching may have evolved as a communication tool to help social cohesion, new research suggests for the first time. [Read More]
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Why exiting prison is so hard  [LINK]
What is the psychological impact of being in prison? By their nature, prisons are highly controlled environments, with a strict routine. Despite the boredom inherent in the setting, it is common for former prisoners to have become ‘dependent’ on strict routines and rules. Depending on the length of their sentence, prisoners can experience a loss of life skills and knowledge of co... [Read More]
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Why ‘fat talk’ can lead to poor body image  [LINK]
“My arms are so flabby.” “I hate my thighs.” “My stomach is too big.” How often do you or women you know engage in this sort of ‘fat talk’? According to one recent Australian study, it happens much more often than you might think. The research reveals that during an average week four out of five young women experience ‘fat talk’ about the... [Read More]
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Measuring the impact of the book-gifting programme Bookbug  [LINK]
Ahead of the 2017 Bookbug conference research fellow Emma Davidson shares a few findings from CRFR's Bookbug research.Bookbug is the Scottish Book Trust’s Early Years programme, encouraging parents and children to share stories, songs and rhymes from birth. The Scottish Book Trust’s Early Years programme has gifted free bags of books and resources to children in Scotland for many years... [Read More]
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Serious concerns for child protection?  [LINK]
By CRFR associate researcher Dr Sarah NelsonSeveral points about the absolute discharge given in Scotland last week by Lady Scott to Daniel Cieslak, who was convicted of raping a 12 year old girl, will greatly concern child protection campaigners for their potentially far-reaching implications.First, the sentence and the judge’s remarks could be seen as in effect lowering the age of consent.... [Read More]
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When is it safe to disclose childhood sexual abuse?  [LINK]
Rusan Lateef, MSW, RSW is a social worker employed in the criminal justice system with adult male offenders in Ontario, Canada. She is a researcher on the “Make Resilience Matter” project examining childhood exposure to domestic violence at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, a project that involves collaboration with CRFR Co-Director Sarah Morton. ... [Read More]
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Research as an intervention: A case study on violence against children in Peru  [LINK]
CRFR co-director Dr Sarah Morton, and colleague Tabitha Casey, share some of their findings from the recently published report, which examined the impact of a research programme aiming to prevent violence against children in Peru. Preventing violence against children is becoming more of a focus for policy makers, with the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals including targets that a... [Read More]
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Researching love can illuminate ongoing obstacles to fathers’ involvement  [LINK]
Dr. Alexandra Macht recently completed her PhD in Sociology at the University of Edinburgh where she was supported by the Centre for Research for Families and Relationships. In this post, Alexandra reports on some of the findings of her research into fatherhood and love. There is very little research on the subject of the love shared between parents and children, and the contemporary father&r... [Read More]
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“A cup of tea and a fag”: doing family in the context of imprisonment.  [LINK]
We are delighted to welcome Dr Cara Jardine to the CRFR research network. Cara is a Research Associate at the University of Strathclyde. Here she reflects on her PhD research which examined what it means to be a family in the context of imprisonment, how these relationships are constructed and maintained, and how those affected by the imprisonment of a family member interact with the criminal just... [Read More]
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Buying Sex in Scotland: Understanding the motives and incentives for paying for sexual services  [LINK]
CRFR is delighted to welcome Dr Holly Davis, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Edinburgh, as an associate researcher. In this post, Holly introduces her research on why individuals pay for sexual services and reflects on the relevance of this within the context of the proposed changes to prostitution laws in Scotland. The best current estimates suggest that between 11-18% of... [Read More]
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Tweet life vs. street life: Exploring the gap between content, feelings  [LINK]
Twitter is an unreliable witness to the world's emotions, suggests a researcher, adding that online social life doesn't always reflect offline social reality. [Read More]
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