Quitting daily aspirin therapy may increase second heart attack, stroke risk  [LINK]
Stopping long-term, low-dose aspirin therapy may increase your risk of suffering a cardiovascular event, research indicates. Risk increases shortly after stopping and does not appear to diminish over time. [Read More]
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Penguin-mounted video captures gastronomic close encounters of the gelatinous kind  [LINK]
Footage from penguin-mounted mini video recorders shows four species of penguin eating jellyfish and other gelatinous animals of the open ocean, a food source penguins were not previously believed to partake of, scientists report. [Read More]
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Snails bred in lab help species crawl back from brink of extinction  [LINK]
Work to restore the endangered Chittenango ovate amber snail, found only in one location inside a Central New York state park, continued this month with the release of tagged adult snails raised in a laboratory. [Read More]
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Being in a good mood for your flu jab boosts its effectiveness  [LINK]
New research by a team of health experts has found evidence that being in a positive mood on the day of your flu jab can increase its protective effect. [Read More]
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Brain's anterior cingulate cortex and its tie to human learning  [LINK]
After four years of lab testing and complex neuro-decoding, a research team has struck a major breakthrough that could open the floodgates for research into the anterior cingulate cortex, or ACC, and how human brains learn. [Read More]
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Prostaglandin EI inhibits leukemia stem cells  [LINK]
Two drugs, already approved for safe use in people, may be able to improve therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a blood cancer that affects myeloid cells, according to new results. [Read More]
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Antarctica: The wind sublimates snowflakes  [LINK]
A team of researchers has collected new data that shows a significant decrease in snow precipitation close to the ground in Antarctica, which has an impact on the ice sheet surface mass balance. [Read More]
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Mechanism of asexual reproduction in flatworms  [LINK]
Scientists have nailed the biomechanics of a centuries-long puzzle on how freshwater flatworms known as planarians reproduce. The asexual freshwater worms, notoriously difficult to study, tear themselves into two pieces that go on to form two new worms. Researchers are now able to predict where planarian fission occurs based on its anatomy as well as explain how the process happens using a relativ... [Read More]
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Creative use of noise brings bio-inspired electronic improvement  [LINK]
Researchers are working to exploit stochastic resonance to enhance signal transmission for a new generation of devices, using single-walled carbon nanotubes. They created a summing network SR device that detects subthreshold signals, fabricated to include a self-noise component. [Read More]
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Audio News for September 17 through September 23, 2017  [LINK]
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Dolphin burial on medieval island presents an unusual puzzle (details) New maps show the unique layout of ancient Teotihuacan (details) New Viking boat burial found in Trondheim, Norway (details) Geology suggests many Greek shrines were built over earthquake faults (details) ... [Read More]
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Holograms for molecules  [LINK]
Scientists have developed a completely new method for the analysis of molecules in liquids on a chip. The possible applications of this technology are immense. It has the potential, inter alia, to revolutionize medical diagnostics. [Read More]
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Metabolism directly impacts the odds of developing malaria  [LINK]
Researchers have found that the host's susceptibility to develop malaria depends on his or her metabolic state, which can be easily manipulated through external stimuli such as dietary patterns. [Read More]
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Ticks are even tougher and nastier than you thought  [LINK]
Studies are showing how ticks can survive drought and cold northern winters. [Read More]
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Creating brain cells to detect Tourette's  [LINK]
Scientists have used a genetic engineering technique for the first time to create brain cells from the blood cells of individuals in a three-generation family with Tourette syndrome to help determine what causes the disease. [Read More]
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Study examines legacies of rainforest burning in British Columbia  [LINK]
Analyses of temperate rain forests located on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada, suggest that for centuries, humans have intentionally used fire to manage plant life. [Read More]
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Click beetles inspire design of self-righting robots  [LINK]
Robots perform many tasks that humans can't or don't want to perform, getting around on intricately designed wheels and limbs. If they tip over, however, they are rendered almost useless. Mechanical engineers and entomologists are looking to click beetles, who can right themselves without the use of their legs, to solve this robotics challenge. [Read More]
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Bone marrow concentrate improves joint transplants  [LINK]
Biologic joint restoration using donor tissue instead of traditional metal and plastic may be an option for active patients with joint defects. Researchers have found in a group of patients that treating donor grafts with bone marrow aspirate concentrate before surgery improves bone integration and speeds recovery. [Read More]
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New non-contact, remote biometric tool could be next advance in computer security  [LINK]
Forget fingerprint computer identification or retinal scanning. Scientists have now developed a computer security system using the dimensions of your heart as your identifier. The system uses low-level Doppler radar to measure your heart, and then continually monitors your heart to make sure no one else has stepped in to run your computer. [Read More]
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IceCube helps demystify strange radio bursts from deep space  [LINK]
Scientists are turning IceCube, the world's most sensitive neutrino telescope, to the task of helping demystify powerful pulses of radio energy generated up to billions of light-years from Earth. [Read More]
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The material that obscures supermassive black holes  [LINK]
New research examines the material that obscures active galactic nuclei obtained from infrared and X-ray observations. [Read More]
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Discovering what makes organelles connect could help explain neurodegenerative diseases  [LINK]
Organelles must exchange signals and materials to make the cell operate correctly. New technologies are allowing researchers to see and understand the networks that connect these organelles, allowing them to build maps of the trade routes that exist within a cell. [Read More]
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Chronic migraine cases are amplified by jawbone disorder  [LINK]
A new study shows patients with chronic migraine are three times as likely to suffer from severe temporomandibular disorder. Though not a primary cause, the disorder is thought to accentuate and perpetuate sensitivity to pain; therefore, researchers recommend in chronic migraine clinical practice the assessment of the disorder's symptoms. [Read More]
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NASA'S OSIRIS-REx spacecraft slingshots past Earth  [LINK]
NASA's asteroid sample return spacecraft successfully used Earth's gravity on Friday to slingshot itself on a path toward the asteroid Bennu, for a rendezvous next August. [Read More]
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Mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss  [LINK]
A major health problem in older people is age-associated osteoporosis -- the thinning of bone and the loss of bone density that increases the risk of fractures. Researchers have now detailed an underlying mechanism leading to that osteoporosis. When this mechanism malfunctions, progenitor cells stop creating bone-producing cells, and instead create fat cells. Knowledge of this mechanism can provid... [Read More]
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