Non-fearful social withdrawal linked positively to creativity  [LINK]
Spending too much time alone can be unhealthy and there is growing evidence that the psychosocial effects of too much solitude can last a lifetime. But newly published research suggests that not all forms of social withdrawal are detrimental. In fact, the research findings suggest that one form of social withdrawal, referred to as unsociability, is not only unrelated to negative outcomes, but link... [Read More]
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Physicists design $100 handheld muon detector  [LINK]
Physicists have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a muon passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable muon detector available today. [Read More]
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Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping  [LINK]
In a breakthrough development, scientists have shown that they can successfully amplify light using electrically excited films of the chemically synthesized semiconductor nanocrystals known as quantum dots. [Read More]
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The evolution of climate change activism studied by researcher  [LINK]
Climate change is a topic that is debated, doubted and covered by news outlets across the world. Now an academic is researching the evolution of climate change activism and how advocacy groups use digital platforms to mobilize. [Read More]
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Slight climate shifts can affect optimum water use in plant communities  [LINK]
A new discovery is providing scientists a better understanding of how rainfall is shared beneficially by the plant community and the human population, in addition to the effects of climate change. [Read More]
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Chimp females who leave home postpone parenthood  [LINK]
Female chimps that lack supportive friends and family wait longer to start having babies, researchers find. An analysis of more than 50 years' worth of daily records for female chimpanzees in Gombe National Park in Tanzania indicates that would-be moms who leave home or are orphaned take roughly three years longer to start a family. [Read More]
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Survey taps students' motivation in STEM  [LINK]
Researchers are learning more about undergraduates' experience in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes and sharing a set of survey questions that will help researchers and educators at other universities do the same. [Read More]
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Preclinical study demonstrates promising treatment for rare bone disease  [LINK]
Researchers have led a preclinical study demonstrating that the drug palovarotene suppresses the formation of bony tumors (osteochondromas) in models of multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE). The research is an important step toward an effective pharmacological treatment for MHE, a rare genetic condition that affects about 1 in 50,000 people worldwide. [Read More]
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New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks  [LINK]
Researchers have shown how to write any magnetic pattern desired onto nanowires, which could help computers mimic how the brain processes information. [Read More]
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Astronomers reveal nearby stars that are among the oldest in our galaxy  [LINK]
Astronomers have discovered some of the oldest stars in our Milky Way galaxy by determining their locations and velocities. [Read More]
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Genome sequencing reveals extensive inbreeding in Scandinavian wolves  [LINK]
Researchers have for the first time determined the full genetic consequences of intense inbreeding in a threatened species. [Read More]
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Sleeve gastrectomy, common weight-loss surgery, lowers women's tolerance to alcohol  [LINK]
Women who have had gastric sleeve surgery to lose weight may want to consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks they consume post-surgery. A new study found that after undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, women could be legally intoxicated after drinking half the number of drinks than women who did not have this surgery. [Read More]
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Seafloor sediments appear to enhance Earthquake and Tsunami danger in Pacific Northwest  [LINK]
The Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of the Pacific Northwest has all the ingredients for making powerful earthquakes -- and according to the geological record, the region is due for its next 'big one.' A new study has found that the occurrence of these big, destructive quakes and associated devastating tsunamis may be linked to compact sediments along large portions of the subduction zone. [Read More]
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Brain stimulation can change how much we enjoy and value music  [LINK]
Researchers have proven it is possible to increase or decrease our enjoyment of music, and our craving for more of it, by enhancement or disruption of certain brain circuits. [Read More]
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Patient-centered medical home model improves chronic disease management  [LINK]
Data from more than 800 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care clinics revealed that national implementation of a patient-centered medical home model was effective at improving several chronic disease outcomes over time. [Read More]
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Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA  [LINK]
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. These DNA snares are called neutrophil extracellular traps or NETs. Researchers describe an important step in how these NETs are released and how they stop a fungus from establishing an infection in mice and human cells. [Read More]
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Previous evidence of water on Mars now identified as grainflows  [LINK]
Dark features previously proposed as evidence for significant liquid water flowing on Mars have now been identified as granular flows, where sand and dust move rather than liquid water, according to a new article. These findings indicate that present-day Mars may not have a significant volume of liquid water. The water-restricted conditions that exist on Mars would make it difficult for Earth-like... [Read More]
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Materialists collect Facebook friends and spend more time on social media  [LINK]
If you're materialistic, you're likely to use Facebook more frequently and intensely. A new article reveals that materialistic people see and treat their Facebook friends as 'digital objects,' and have significantly more friends than people who are less interested in possessions. It also shows that materialists have a greater need to compare themselves with others on Facebook. [Read More]
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Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar  [LINK]
New maps of a mountainous landscape under a key glacier in West Antarctica will be a valuable aid in forecasting sea level changes. [Read More]
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Righty blue whales sometimes act like lefties, study finds  [LINK]
To support their hulking bodies, blue whales use various acrobatic maneuvers to scoop up many individually tiny prey, filtering the water back out through massive baleen plates. In most cases, the whales roll to the right as they capture their prey, just as most people are right-handed. But, researchers now show that the whales shift directions and roll left when performing 360° barrel rolls i... [Read More]
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Audio News for November 12 through 18, 2017  [LINK]
News items read by Laura Pettigrew include: Cluny Abbey diggers find medieval stash of coins (details) Fire torches 4,000-year-old temple in Peru, damaging most of its famous early murals (details) Cross-cultural study shows social inequality arose in early agricultural societies (details) Arabian rock carvings of dogs on leashes may be world... [Read More]
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New second line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer is effective and safe  [LINK]
A randomized trial in 650 patients has confirmed the safety and efficacy of a new second line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. [Read More]
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Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants  [LINK]
Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research. [Read More]
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Interstellar space probes: Where's the brakes?  [LINK]
With a miniaturized space probe capable of being accelerated to a quarter of the speed of light, we could reach Alpha Centauri, our nearest star, in 20 to 50 years. However, without a mechanism to slow it down, the space probe could only collect data from the star and its planets as it zoomed past. A theoretical physicist has now examined whether interstellar spacecraft can be decelerated using 'm... [Read More]
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